Quinoa Salad with Sweet Potatoes and Pears

This salad is a meal in one bowl. It features lots of foods popular with Adventists and also in other Blue Zones. Serve it for lunch or dinner.

Servings:
4
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Quinoa Salad with Sweet Potatoes and Pears Recipe

Ingredients

1⁄4 cup extra-virgin olive oil
3⁄4 cup uncooked white or red quinoa
1 large sweet potato (about 12 ounces), peeled and cut into 1⁄2-inch cubes
2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar
1⁄2 teaspoon salt
1⁄4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
6 cups arugula, preferably baby arugula
2 medium red-skinned pears, cored and thinly sliced
1⁄2 medium red onion, sliced into thin half-moons
1⁄2 cup packed fresh Italian flat-leaf parsley leaves, roughly chopped
1⁄4 cup packed fresh mint leaves, preferably spearmint leaves, roughly chopped

Directions

Position the rack in the center of the oven and heat the oven to 400°F.
Warm 1 tablespoon of the oil in a medium saucepan set over medium heat.
Add the quinoa and cook, stirring often, until lightly toasted, about 2 minutes.
Pour in 11⁄2 cups water, raise to high heat, and bring to a boil.
Cover, reduce to low heat, and simmer slowly until the water has been absorbed, about 15 minutes.
Remove from the heat and set aside, covered, for 10 minutes.
Fluff with a fork, spread on a large plate, and refrigerate for at least 30 minutes or up to 4 hours.
Toss the sweet potato cubes with 1 tablespoon of the olive oil on a large rimmed baking sheet.
Bake until golden brown, stirring once, about 30 minutes.
Cool on the baking sheet for 20 to 30 minutes.
Whisk the remaining 2 tablespoons of oil with the vinegar, salt, and pepper in a large salad bowl.
Add the arugula, pears, onion, parsley, and mint, as well as the chilled quinoa and sweet potatoes.
Toss gently but well to serve.

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